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Friday, August 21, 2015

Jared and porn, more celebrity worship


Jared's in possession of child porn. Or something of that nature.

(Note: I don't want to seem flippant about sex crimes and crimes against children, but my rant might appear that way, so just a warning - this rant is about celebrities and the undeserved love and adoration they receive from us, the public, who  should know better and channel  it into something more useful than complaining about their hair or their butt or whatever crime or indiscretion they are now involved with. I am not downplaying the nature of the crime, only highlighting how silly we should feel for idolizing these people at all, regardless of what they do or do not do.)

 There is a shocking amount of outrage- people can't believe he did that, he seemed so wholesome and achieved his goal or why didn't Subway vet him better, who is responsible? Uhhh. I was at a loss for words about the reaction to this. I mean who cares?? Who is he really? Was he such a big role model anyway? We know pedophilia exists, so that's not a shock. Priests were involved and they were at least bound by a moral code you can look up. Should we be shocked about Jared, a guy you don't know? Not to dismiss this crime at at all, it  is horrific, but why are we seemingly more bent out of shape about it than when it happens to ordinary people? Is everyone who loses weight and signs on with an ad campaign of such a stellar moral character that we can't expect such a thing from them? Do we honestly revere him or Subway to such an extent that we believed such a “fall” impossible? This kind of crime is always unacceptable, but to be so disappointed as though you knew the guy seems a bit much for me. 

The bigger question is why do people hold up these sports figures, reality TV stars, commercial stars (whatever he was) in the first place? I don't understand the rat race, the never ending quest to get rich and famous, always wanting a bigger house, luxury car, fleet of luxury cars. I want a car that works, shelter that's low maintenance and books. I read that this was because I'm an introvert and we don't care about that stuff. Or maybe I'm trying to minimize disappointment. But I've always been that way. In 5th grade we had to write about a role model. I struggled with who to pick because I didn't have any. Parents are the obvious choice, but didn't fit the image I had when I thought role model. I don't want to be exactly like anyone. I picked Jim Davis because I loved Garfield and he can draw and make people laugh and I thought those were nice skills to have. But even then I felt disingenuous calling him a role model. I didn't want to be him or model my life after him, I wanted to be me. 

Famous people are just people. Not exceptional, not more moral, not superhuman, not born with more talent, just stinking "lucky" (a good word only if you want to be famous) most of the time. So they were in the right place at the right time or they had connections. Is that deserving of our praise and fawning? So they can do something better than you and you admire that work ethic that got them there- why not work on your skills instead of sending them fan mail, falling in love with them and never missing an event they are involved with- how will that improve your game?? People you put up on a pedestal will always disappoint you anyway. You couldn't change them if you wanted to make them conform to your standard for hero anyway. You do, however, have control over yourself, so I'd recommend putting our energy there. Why don't we put all this money and energy that we put into idolizing famous people into bettering ourselves and helping others? We could reverse this upside down or backwards culture of ours and focus  on making education and health care accessible to all instead of buying self help books that tell us how to be successful, buying into the latest absurd celebrity trend whether it be eating placenta, keeping the colon completely empty, wearing transparent dresses or necklines that plunge to the pelvis. We could reorder things so that teachers would make more than professional athletes.